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recoveryisbeautiful:

Personal Victories  //  Alyse Ruriani, 2014

This is fucking AMAZING.

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Have sex. Have dirty, raunchy sex. Have sex in the bed, on the counter, in the car, in the bathroom. Have it everywhere. Have passionate love making sex. Fuck. Go slow. Gaze into their eyes. Learn every curve and bump on their body. Learn what makes them quiver. Learn what makes them cum the hardest. Feel their body and fall back in love with them. Just have sex.
— (via rabbits3x)
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permutatio:

"I loved a man who could never love me back. I was living in a fairytale."

Big Fish (2003) dir. Tim Burton 

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brxkenpetal:

melachalent:

Palo Alto (Gia Coppola)

instagram: @lostpetal

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The term natural also gets thrown around in the entertainment and beauty industries. Countless websites have galleries of celebrities either caught without makeup by the paparazzi or posing bare faced for photo spreads in magazines. Depending on the publication, commentary ranges from “OMG ewww!” through to gushing discussions of the bravery involved with said celebrity allowing themselves to be photographed without makeup. The whole concept of being “photographed in their natural state” carries an inherent silliness, because putting any kind of lens between the viewer and the thing being viewed makes it look different than it does to the naked eye. Different kinds of lighting change the way a person’s face looks, as does viewing it from different angles. You can easily experiment with this yourself if you have a camera lying around. As in the porn industry, use of Photoshop, subtle cosmetic surgery, or hair dye is rarely disclosed when a magazine labels a person’s appearance as “natural.”

What about advertisements like Dove’s Real Beauty campaign? Their definition of beauty is vocally accepting of wrinkles and gray hair, but it does appear to be heavily reliant on even-toned and blemish-free skin. Sure, freckles are deemed acceptable, but I have yet to see a giant red pimple on the nose of one of the women in Dove’s ads. Nor have I seen them feature a model with a port-wine birthmark or a case of eczema. They do show a broader range of skin colors and body shapes than a fashion magazine usually does, but they don’t include people with visible physical disabilities or obvious large scars. Natural is, again, a marketing tool; they’re using the concept of confidence coming from within to hawk more lotions to rub on your outside. They’re redefining the word natural to correlate with how little makeup a woman is wearing, and they’re totemizing this willingness to appear in public without cosmetics as courageous. — Natural Beauty Is Just a Marketing Tool by Stoya [x]

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a$$



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